muninnhuginn: (Default)

Well, once I'd broken the less antediluvian of the PCs, I had to do something with the weekend.


a slog and a romp )

muninnhuginn: (Default)

There's another layer of the book-reading onion peeled away.


more death? )

muninnhuginn: (Default)

I've got Looby Loo trained to drag me away from any display of books on sale--even second hand--with cries of "You're not to buy any more books, Mummy!" Last week I went into town with the Aged P however and bought one book (admittedly twice over, the second copy being a birthday present for my brother (who I fairly safely assume doesn't read this)). So another interstitial completion


death )

muninnhuginn: (Default)

I'm actually in the middle of about three other books, but these intervened, and have now been dispatched. I'm aiming to finish the other three I'm currently reading this week--or give 'em on up.


two books and some grouchiness )

muninnhuginn: (Default)

  1. Haruki Murakami, A Wild Sheep Chase
  2. Ulrich von Liechtenstein, The Service of Ladies
  3. Philip Roth, The Plot Against America
  4. ed. The Lifted Veil, 19th Century Women's Stories
  5. Bremner, Bird, Fortune, You Are Here
  6. Polly Bird, How to Be an Effective School Governor
  7. Jean Estoril, Ballet Twins
  8. Andre Norton, Judgment on Janus
  9. Granta 89, The Factory
  10. Gene Wolfe, The Claw of the Conciliator
  11. Gene Wolfe, The Sword of the Lictor
  12. Patrick McGrath, Dr Haggard's Disease
  13. James Barclay, Dreamthief
  14. Paul Cornell, British Summertime

  15. Ken Macleod, Dark Light
    Looby Loo's taken great interest in the title. It's an occasionally annoying read, but also very witty, and the story is tremendous. It even made sense when I hadn't read book one.

muninnhuginn: (Default)

the cumulative list )

muninnhuginn: (Default)

An addition, but no comment )

muninnhuginn: (Default)

A couple more for the list

  1. Haruki Murakami, A Wild Sheep Chase
  2. Ulrich von Liechtenstein, The Service of Ladies
  3. Philip Roth, The Plot Against America
  4. ed. The Lifted Veil, 19th Century Women's Stories
  5. Bremner, Bird, Fortune, You Are Here
  6. Polly Bird, How to Be an Effective School Governor
  7. Jean Estoril, Ballet Twins
  8. Andre Norton, Judgment on Janus
  9. Granta 89, The Factory
  10. Gene Wolfe, The Claw of the Conciliator
  11. Gene Wolfe, The Sword of the Lictor
    Another reread. Must find a cheap copy of the final part now.
  12. Patrick McGrath, Dr Haggard's Disease
    Fascinating, an irresistible purchase since it had Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog on the cover (to match my copy of Frankenstein). McGrath's been on the author to be read list for a good while. Why did I wait? This was fascinating, both for period detail-- it's set in England just prior to and into the early years of WWII--and the obsessive first-person narrator. Creepy, too. Muted gothic.

muninnhuginn: (Default)

The list:

  1. Haruki Murakami, A Wild Sheep Chase
  2. Ulrich von Liechtenstein, The Service of Ladies
  3. Philip Roth, The Plot Against America
  4. ed. The Lifted Veil, 19th Century Women's Stories
  5. Bremner, Bird, Fortune, You Are Here
  6. Polly Bird, How to Be an Effective School Governor
  7. Jean Estoril, Ballet Twins
  8. Andre Norton, Judgment on Janus
  9. Granta 89, The Factory
  10. Gene Wolfe, The Claw of the Conciliator
    Another reread. I found a lovely typo: "... rats that ran in circles and bit their own tales when one clapped one's hands." Well, I assume it's a typo. With Wolfe I'd never be quite certain. The image is lovely, tho'.

muninnhuginn: (Default)

Another one bites the dust, this time the dust of fading industries and the squalor of their replacements


On with the list:

  1. Haruki Murakami, A Wild Sheep Chase
  2. Ulrich von Liechtenstein, The Service of Ladies
  3. Philip Roth, The Plot Against America
  4. ed. The Lifted Veil, 19th Century Women's Stories
  5. Bremner, Bird, Fortune, You Are Here
  6. Polly Bird, How to Be an Effective School Governor
  7. Jean Estoril, Ballet Twins
  8. Andre Norton, Judgment on Janus
  9. Granta 89, The Factory
    Years back, my Granta subscription was proof of my reading things other than the usual genre fiction, my link back into mainstream fiction, especially contemporary "stuff". For a while, it's been almost the only fiction I've read (this year is proving to be an exception in terms of recent book choices). I, sometimes dutifully, plough through each issue, resisting the urge to look at the pictures in the middle until I actually reach them sequentially. This one wasn't one of the gems. Apart from Isabel Hilton's depiction of Chinese industrial development, its descent from the apparently happy paternalism of the communist-style factories to the worst of free-market capitalism, which was a new perspective, everything seemed very much the usual depiction of the decline of western manufacturing. That's not to say the personal accounts and family histories weren't interesting and affecting. But we've been there, done that, lived through it ourselves quite enough now. The subject's as dead as the industries it depicts. Humph.

muninnhuginn: (Default)

OK, so some of this was work and some was just feeling exceedingly pissed off on a Saturday night combined with fond memories of ballet stories when I was ten or so. Also, I've not added anything and I wouldn't like to give the impression I wasn't busily reading away.


The list:

  1. Haruki Murakami, A Wild Sheep Chase
  2. Ulrich von Liechtenstein, The Service of Ladies
  3. Philip Roth, The Plot Against America
  4. The Lifted Veil, 19th Century Women's Stories
  5. Bremner, Bird, Fortune, You Are Here
  • Polly Bird, How to Be an Effective School Governor
    'Nuff said.
  • Jean Estoril, Ballet Twins
    This shows its age--originally published in 1967--in its rather stilted prose. It's a nice story tho'. It's not mine: it was passed onto me for Looby Loo who will probably cope with it in a couple of years time when we've got through Ballet Shoes.

  • More Books

    Feb. 24th, 2005 04:29 pm
    muninnhuginn: (Default)

    What is it with goldfish? In the list of "lifestyle enhancements" in You Are Here, we get "screensavers (especially goldfish)". A bit dated, methinks. Goldfish are so, well, early to mid-nineties: think the Bravo ads especially the Twin Peaks one; think the credit card advertised using Billy Connolly..... That was in the days before everything--or at least Red Bull and female sanitary protection--had wings. The vagaries of advertising icons.


    On with the list:

    1. Haruki Murakami, A Wild Sheep Chase
    2. Ulrich von Liechtenstein, The Service of Ladies
    3. Philip Roth, The Plot Against America
    4. The Lifted Veil, Women's 19th Century Stories (Folio Society)
      Interesting, gothic collection. It rather highlights how the supernatural has been marginalised from mainstream fiction. These are almost without exception tales from household names, both then and now, and yet they use elements of the gothic and the supernatural in a way more likely to be nowadays marginalised to genre fiction.
    5. Bremner, Bird, Fortune, You Are Here
      Occasionally amusing, but, much like their TV programmes, mainly just depressingly enlightening. I found one bit of good news: "The WWII Debt [to the US] (totalling $4,336 trillion will finally be paid off on 31 December 2006." Do we need to start a campaign now to have the equivalent of the repayments ring-fenced for something really useful?

    muninnhuginn: (Default)

    This was one I bought for M, either for his birthday or Xmas (can't recall which), since he tends to enjoy alternative histories. I tend not to. Although the alternative occupations and fates of various well-known figures in Allen Steele's The Tranquillity Alternative amused me no end, it was not this element that kept me reading, merely a sideshow for a fast-paced thriller.


    On with the list:

    1. Haruki Murakami, A Wild Sheep Chase
    2. Ulrich von Liechtenstein, The Service of Ladies
    3. Philip Roth, The Plot Against America
      Much more interesting than I'd expected. I have quibbles: the ending's a let down, the potted biographies Anne Morrow Lindbergh to a part of her husband's entry when lesser male figures got their own entries and her part in the outcome of the novel is pivotal. I was both convinced and annoyed by the digressive nature of the narrative and I think this is where the novel's main weakness lies. Structurally it's a bit baggy and inconclusive. The wider results of the events described can only be inferred: the fact that the narrator survives to produce his narrative as an adult could imply no more than he was a lucky one and that much of the program might have continued. It's also a cold novel. I found it hard to warm to any of the characters, but this may be deliberate on the author's part.
      Roth's been on my meaning to read sometime list for somewhere near 25 years, so I'm glad I've got there at last. I may seek some more of his stuff out.

    muninnhuginn: (Default)

    As Geoffrey Chaucer (in the person of Paul Bettany) might say. A bit of a slow read, but I'm through with another book (actually last week sometime, but this is the first good opportunity to write it up):

    1. Haruki Murakami, A Wild Sheep Chase
    2. Ulrich von Liechtenstein, The Service of Ladies
    S'long )

    muninnhuginn: (Default)

    I've kept lists, on paper, of books read over various periods of time. This time, without the risk of losing the pieces of paper, I'm as much interested in the fiction/non-fiction split. I seem, I think, to have morphed from a reader almost entirely of fiction to a reader of mainly non-fiction, mostly history. Somewhere along the way, poetry seems to have dropped right of the map. This end of the year, the contents are likely to be skewed by the nature of whatever we received as birthday or Xmas presents. Being a fairly slow reader, I don't suppose the list will be long: I'm not even expecting to clear the backlog (about 70 unread or part-read volumes alongside the futon).


    So, to start out:

    1. Haruki Murakami, A Wild Sheep Chase, fiction, Xmas present from J
      Hardly earth-shatteringly novel after two consecutive Jonathan Carrolls, but well-worth the read, despite the annoying translation: too American--use of the phrase "the longest time" always makes me want to scream--and I don't need hibachi translating by way of a description ("ceramic brazier"). All the same, there were a handful of telling images:
      In a sunken area in the middle of the coffee lounge, a woman wearing a bright pink dress sat at a cerulean blue grand piano playing quintessential hotel-coffee-lounge numbers filled with arpeggios and syncopation. Not bad actually, though not an echo lingered in the air beyond the last note of each number.
      and
      Still, it was unsettling seeing with my very own eyes a scene I had by now seen hundreds of times in a photograph. The depth of the actual place seemed artificial. Less my being there than the sense that the scene had been temporarily thrown together in order to match the photograph.

    Profile

    muninnhuginn: (Default)
    muninnhuginn

    September 2017

    S M T W T F S
         1 2
    3456789
    10111213141516
    17181920212223
    24252627282930

    Syndicate

    RSS Atom

    Most Popular Tags

    Style Credit

    Expand Cut Tags

    No cut tags
    Page generated Sep. 23rd, 2017 11:06 am
    Powered by Dreamwidth Studios